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K-12 Education Resources

The latest on all student-centered models, leadership development, strategic planning, teacher retention, and all things innovation in K-12 education. We answer questions before you think to ask them.

Blog Feature

Communication  |  Surveys

7 Mistakes to Avoid When Implementing a School Survey

Feedback has the ability to strengthen your new initiative or culture. But give a lousy survey, and you can set your school or district back in terms of trust, and you may lose the ability to gather important input in the future. Don’t turn a positive opportunity into a negative. 

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Blog Feature

Equity  |  Innovative Leadership  |  Strategic Planning

5 Tips for Building a Profile of a Graduate

Graduate profiles are becoming increasingly popular in districts and can function in a multitude of  ways. From formulating the basis for an instructional vision to getting started with performance based grading, graduate profiles clearly articulate outcomes for learners and provide critical guidance for staff and leaders.    A graduate profile may also be referred to as Portrait of a Graduate, Profile of a Graduate, Journey of a Graduate, or Journey of a Learner. The precise term is not as important as the way in which it was created, and how it functions within your district or school community. At Education Elements we believe in the importance of building and creating a profile collaboratively; that the process of creation is, in fact, just as important as the end product. We also believe that when designing a graduate profile, it is important to do so with a student-centered approach.    Read the following five tips for planning that will lead to an impactful and relevant graduate profile that your community is excited about. 

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Blog Feature

Curriculum Strategy & Adoption  |  District Leadership

A Simple Guide to Adopting a New Curriculum

As more and more high-quality instructional materials (HQIM) become available, we have noticed a tension with districts across the country between being excited about the opportunities for new, rigorous materials, and the concern about when and how to get started.    While some district-level decisions are guided by state policy and timelines, there are five components that we have found that will help to shape any district’s academic strategy, regardless of where it is during an adoption window. These components include: 

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Teacher Retention

Increasing Teacher Agency Leads to Better Decisions & Happier Teachers

As students across the county prepare for the start of a new school year, conversations about how to address our national teacher shortage are becoming more frequent and urgent. Many educators are calling for this conversation to be rebranded as a “teacher walkout” to highlight that teachers are leaving the field as a way to protest a system not built to empower them as decision-makers and innovators. This shift in language – from “teacher shortage” to “teacher walkout” – illuminates a key design element that districts can leverage proactively to respond to retention challenges: teacher agency.    

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Blog Feature

Instructional Coaching  |  School Leadership

Supercharge Your Teachers: 3 actions instructional leaders should take now

Educators are often described as superheros; this includes instructional leaders. Here's our superhero-inspired, 3 simple actions that instructional leaders can take in the next month to ensure that teachers and students marvel at their own growth this year. (See what we did there!)

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Blog Feature

School Leadership  |  Teacher Retention

5 Reasons Why Investing in School Leaders will Retain Teachers

Teacher turnover is an issue that has impacted school districts all across the country. Teachers are leaving the profession in record numbers while not enough are entering it. Therefore school districts are scrambling to fill vacancies with qualified educators. Teacher retention is a complicated issue. It is a challenge that has many facets, none of which seem to have simple solutions. It is in times like these that we turn to our leaders for guidance. Fortunately great leadership has proven to be a key lever in retaining our nation’s teachers. 

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Blog Feature

Communication  |  Crisis Management

Tough Stuff: How to talk to your students and children about difficult topics

School leaders, teachers and parents have had to navigate difficult conversations in the last few years. During the panedemic, they explained to students that the learning will be shifting again to virtual, that collaboration will look and feel different, that although “sharing is caring,” let’s pause on the sharing of supplies for now. The skill it takes to navigate these discussions with students and children is already complex; but add the sensitivity needed to when students are grappling with schooling and social loss, and we can appreciate that our leaders, teachers, and parents have had a crash course in communicating through disruption. 

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Blog Feature

Data  |  District Leadership  |  Surveys  |  Teams & Culture

8 Questions to Consider when Designing a School Survey

When working on surveys for a large school district, I heard it all.  We don’t trust you with our survey data. What did you do with last year’s survey? This survey takes too long. What am I supposed to do with this survey data? Often when these responses arise, it’s due to poor survey design, poor follow through, and a less-than-authentic approach – all of which can erode trust and lead to unsupported claims. 

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Strategic Planning

4 Tips to Design a Visually Compelling Strategic Plan

You have just spent months engaging your community, identifying your priorities and getting your wording just right. It feels like you are inches from the finish line as you think about rolling out your final plan to the community. This is certainly a huge feat and worth a celebration but you are not quite done yet! 

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Blog Feature

Teacher Retention  |  Teams & Culture

Strong Teacher Retention Starts with Onboarding

During the next few weeks, districts and schools will begin the process of welcoming and onboarding their new teachers for the 22-23 school year. When done effectively, new teacher onboarding can allow new staff to gain clarity on their specific roles and feel welcomed into their school community.

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  School Leadership

Creating & Maintaining Community with Teams During Tough Times

March 2nd is a day that will never be forgotten in Putnam County, TN. Our small community woke up to the sirens of an EF4 tornado that rocked our community and two weeks later our school system closed when the COVID pandemic hit home all across the state of Tennessee. 

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  School Leadership

Preparing Leaders for the Upcoming School Year

Across the country, educators and educational leaders have celebrated their graduations, held their end-of-year promotion ceremonies, and cleaned out their classrooms. After another unpredictable year, many are eager to get some well-deserved time away this summer. As a leader, you likely want for your team to be able to really unwind and enjoy the summer. Consider setting aside some time for your team to officially close out SY 2021-2022, and to prepare for a strong start when they return to start SY 2022-2023. 

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Blog Feature

Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  Surveys  |  Teacher Retention

6 Strategies to Create a Staff Culture of Listening - Starting with Surveys

Addressing the staffing shortage in public schools may seem like running a marathon barefoot, uphill, and in the sweltering sun. When faced with an ever-expanding school and district improvement checklist, it’s human nature to pick the seemingly more manageable task first. Why not run the morning mile on the padded track instead of the impossible race? 

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Blog Feature

Personalized Learning  |  Professional Development

How We Grow When Times Are Challenging

To meet the needs of an ever-changing tomorrow, school districts must continue to grow and evolve. At its most desired state, a classroom is a laboratory of innovation and its teacher, a "mad" scientist - working everyday to make connections between students and the content. Unfortunately, the chaotic uncertainty of the last two years have left educators fighting to survive, leaving little time for experimentation. This reality leads us to an important question: how can we measure growth and innovation during these challenging times? 

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Blog Feature

Personalized Learning  |  Teachers

Guided Practice: Building the muscle of civil discourse in the classroom

If you lead a district, school, or department, or if you are a teacher yourself, then you may have seen that civil discourse that relies on evidence is increasingly under attack. We might experience this, at times locally in our Board meetings, and nationally in the broader conversation.

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Blog Feature

Innovative Leadership  |  School Districts

Four Actions to Make Your First Year As a Superintendent Count

Let’s just be clear: there is a very short honeymoon period for a new superintendent. From day one, people have expectations of you as the new superintendent. They want you to be exactly the same or completely different than your predecessor. They have their hopes pinned on you bringing new ideas or have their fingers crossed that you won’t. They are wondering how long you will stay and what you will do during your tenure. They both expect you to know everything about the district right away, and yet know that you don’t and are frustrated by it. They have so many things they want to say to you, and yet voice few of them, as if you can read minds.

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Blog Feature

Narrowing the Focus when Selecting HQIM

When teachers don’t have access to strong materials, they search for them often online, leading to inconsistent quality and weak alignment to the standards. In fact, some have found that teachers spend 7-12 hours per week searching for and creating instructional resources. 

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Blog Feature

Data  |  Surveys

What are teachers telling us? Are we listening?

This spring, Merrimack College and EdWeek Research Center released a whitepaper publishing their findings for their Teacher Survey. One of the takeaways? Forty-three percent of respondents said they were somewhat dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their jobs.   “The last two years have been fraught for teachers as their profession has consistently attracted public attention—much of it hostile—due to political and cultural battles over pandemic-related policies on masking and vaccines and new laws curtailing instruction related to race, racism, and gender,” the report says.

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Blog Feature

Strategic Planning

From School Strategic Plan to Action: Reflections from a Superintendent

It's been a year since the school district surrounding Columbus, Indiana started their strategic planning process. The district team partnered with Education Elements, and during a time of increased uncertainty, chose to set a clear direction. Now, as the Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation prepares to roll out their new plan this coming fall, we talk with superintendent Dr. Jim Roberts about how he is positioning the work with the community, so that together they can do the challenging work of reaching their goals.

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Teachers

3 Ways to Deliver Feedback that Drives Change

"Feedback is a gift." Most of us have heard this common phrase as educators, coaches, and professionals. But if feedback is a gift, why does receiving it sometimes trigger uneasiness, anxiety, and stress? 

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  School Districts  |  Teacher Retention  |  Teachers

4 Ways to Weave Teacher Appreciation Throughout the Year

We all know that teachers should feel appreciated every day. As a former high school science teacher, I was filled up by the positive notes from students, small gifts, and verbal affirmations received during teacher appreciation week. Recognition is an important way for teachers to feel appreciated; we believe that in our four essential elements of teacher belonging (Agency, Development, Equity, and Wellness), appreciation is relevant to all categories, especially Development and Wellness.

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Blog Feature

Curriculum Strategy & Adoption  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  Strategic Planning

Solving Curricular Challenges: Driving Change through a Clear Vision

In our work with districts across the country, we frequently hear questions about instructional materials–from how to select high quality programs that match their needs, to building processes that are inclusive of key stakeholders, to developing sustainable processes for regularly reviewing and refining curriculum, just to name a few. Oftentimes, we see teams wanting to jump directly into reviewing materials or selecting a new program. But where we have seen the most success is in beginning with a clear instructional vision and using that to drive future work with curriculum or academics. 

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Blog Feature

School Leadership  |  Teacher Retention  |  Teachers  |  Teams & Culture

Top 10 Teacher Superpowers that Put the Marvel Superheroes to Shame

If you’ve ever watched a superhero movie, you’ve probably wondered which superpower you would like to embody. Super strength or super flexibility? Invisibility or the power to fly? It may surprise you to learn that superheroes live among us and go about their lives, often unnoticed. If you look closely, however, you may spot them shopping at the grocery store, taking their pets for a stroll in the park, or, most commonly, shopping for treasures in the $1 bins at Target. 

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Blog Feature

School Leadership  |  Teacher Retention  |  Teachers

9 Ways to Recognize and Appreciate Teachers

Next week is Teacher Appreciation Week. Although we at Education Elements believe that teachers should be celebrated on any day that ends in a “y”, we also are excited to join in the Nationwide celebrations next week. As a former teacher, a little “thank you” went a long way, a gifted morning coffee fueled me to empower my students through testing season, and a card highlighting my impact reminded me of my “why.” 

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Blog Feature

Instructional Coaching  |  Personalized Learning  |  Teachers

How Student Choice Helped Me Grow Out of My Perfectionism

I am a recovering perfectionist. As a kid, I always colored within the lines of my coloring book; not because I wanted to follow the rules, but because I enjoyed precision. As a teacher, I bought a laser level tool so that my posters would all be hung at the exact same height. Perfectionism can bring a sense of pride, especially when applied to a tangible outcome. I admired my coloring book pages in the same way I did my classroom walls.

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Blog Feature

Classrooms  |  Personalized Learning  |  School Districts

Six Examples of What Personalized Learning Looks Like

Each year we receive hundreds of questions along the lines of, “Okay…so what does personalized learning actually look like?” We have a few answers to this question. One is that personalized learning always involves these core four elements - targeted instruction, data-driven decisions, flexible content, and student reflection and ownership. Check out our Core Four white paper for a more detailed description of these elements, as well as classroom examples.

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Blog Feature

Blended Learning  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  Teachers

Go Slow to Go Fast: Blended Learning at John F Kennedy High School

“When you drive up to John F Kennedy High School in Cleveland, OH, you are immediately taken by the sheer scale of the building. Set against a backdrop of single-family historic homes, JFK is an imposing and beautiful modern structure. The vision of the school was simple: to combine the staff from 3 previous high schools, including the “old” JFK, to create the New JFK. Inside, the hallways are wide and bright,  natural light streaming in from every which way. It is a dynamic and inviting space, with collaborative spaces carved out of the hallways outside classrooms and across balcony walkways from the second floor.The classrooms themselves are spacious, with state-of-the-art tech, and an opportunity at every corner to support new and innovative instructional strategies, like blended learning. 

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Blog Feature

Equity  |  New School Design  |  Strategic Planning

Grading for Equity: One School’s Approach to Increasing Student Ownership and Success

This school year, Portland Public Schools (PPS) launched a multi-year strategic plan for educational equity, inclusion, and excellence with the core belief that the student experience needs to be reimagined. PPS’ district-wide focus spotlighted the middle school experience, where data revealed – regardless of metric – that students are not being adequately prepared for high school and beyond. Meisha Plotzke, Senior Director, Middle Grade Academics and Middle School Innovation and Redesign, partnered with Education Elements asking, “How do we redesign the middle-school experience so that every student, and in particular our Black and Native students, deeply engages in strong instruction, with grade appropriate assignments, grounded in high teacher expectations, and personalized, integrated supports?”

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Blog Feature

Blended Learning  |  Instructional Coaching  |  Personalized Learning

Personalizing Learning: Getting it Right

I can’t remember how many times I have been asked “Am I doing it right?” I’ve heard this question so many times in my support of over 150 schools as they implement personalized learning that I no longer count. Teachers and leaders want to know, am I “doing” personalized learning right.

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  School Leadership

Cultivating Leadership Effectiveness & Wellness

Every teacher has a purpose. Every teacher has a reason that they entered the classroom. For some, that purpose originated when they were a student in school. For others, it was an unbridled passion for their content area. Each teacher’s own “why” is what makes them unique and valuable members of their school. However when adversity strikes, purpose is often the first thing that a teacher puts down. In fact, what may seem noble in spirit, the selflessness of forgoing one’s purpose to serve others is often misguided. 

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Blog Feature

District Partners in the News  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management

Leveraging Students’ Strengths to Develop Student Leaders

Kate Sanders, Teacher: How do I empower more student leaders? This question had been circling my brain for months. As the adviser for the Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) chapter at Sequatchie County High School, I have had the opportunity to facilitate unique opportunities for student leaders. However, much of the workload is placed on the shoulders of the FCCLA officer team. They plan and coordinate the monthly student service projects while participating in the organization's competitive event side. It was a heavy load. Not to mention, many officers are committed to various other organizations and after-school work. And, because most of my officers are preparing to graduate this year, I quickly recognized that I must find a way to empower our underclassmen to assume these leadership roles.

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Blog Feature

Strategic Planning

Thank You Nintendo: Lessons learned that can help your strategic planning initiatives stick

As a product of the 90s I spent my late elementary school years like many of my contemporaries: playing Super Nintendo. I grew up with a large group of cousins and whenever we got together we approached video games as a group project. We took turns helping one another with the tough spots in the game; those of us who were older played a “leadership” role, determining who got to play, and – if we had enough lives left – when we would give a little kid a chance. In retrospect, we had a clear strategy: take turns in order to share a limited resource while achieving our goal - to get the highest score possible.

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Blog Feature

Surveys  |  Teacher Retention

Prioritizing Teacher Voice to Recruit and Retain High-Quality Teachers

The staffing crisis in K-12 education continues to zap time, energy, and resources for districts that are already stretched thin, exhausted, and steadfast in their commitment to ensuring students receive high-quality learning experiences. And while we know that it is important to find innovative solutions to address the complexities of teacher recruitment and retention, we also know that some of the potential answers already exist and are closer than we think.

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Innovative Leadership  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  School Leadership

It’s Elementary: Targeted K12 Leadership Development for Tackling Big Problems

As we write this, we are thinking back to the last “normal” month in 2020 before COVID-19 arrived in full force. A sampling of headlines from Education Weekly in February 2020 highlight social and emotional learning, the role of technology in education, and the importance of effective school leadership. With the benefit of hindsight, we can reflections of what we faced then, pre-COVID, in the complex challenges facing school leaders now. Now, with added urgency to prioritize and act on these problems quickly.

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Blog Feature

Equity  |  Surveys

The Importance of the DEI Survey

In late May of 2020, as our country battled the coronavirus, the murder of George Floyd sent shockwaves through many communities, across the United States. In fact, his murder galvanized millions of Americans to examine structural and institutional inequities particularly for Black Americans, but also across race, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic status – a renewed focus not seen since the civil rights movement of the 1960s. 

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Blog Feature

Decision-Making  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  School Districts  |  Strategic Planning

5 Tips for Leaders Starting Strategic Plans

These past three years have been very difficult for students, teachers, and school leaders. It seems that as life is getting “back to normal” there is something that comes in and disrupts the progress being made. What this time has shown us, though, is that this is the perfect opportunity to start fresh. 

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Blog Feature

Coaches  |  Instructional Coaching  |  Teacher Retention

Facing the Great Resignation? Support Instructional Coaches

A recent Forbes article said, “If the big challenge of 2021 was to get children back into the classroom, the challenge for 2022 is to keep teachers there.” With statistics showing a 66% rise in school-based departures and schools across the country scrambling to fill teacher and substitute shortages each week — all while working to bounce back from the pandemic — the need to support our teaching staff has never been greater. 

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Blog Feature

Curriculum Strategy & Adoption  |  Personalized Learning

Personalizing within the Curriculum: High Quality Instructional Materials as a Lever for Student-Centered Learning

Over the last 10 years, we have seen a significant shift in how educators access and leverage instructional materials to guide instruction. As many states adopted new, more rigorous standards, curriculum providers rushed to create materials that would prepare students for college and career and state assessments.   Though it took time, the current market for high-quality instructional materials (HQIM) is strong and presents states, districts, and educators with a different set of challenges. With so many options, how do you select the best materials to meet your needs and context, and how do you leverage these materials to foster student-centered learning? Join us as we explore key issues and potential solutions through a series of blogs, webinars, and videos.

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Strategic Planning

Halftime for your Strategic Plan

This upcoming Sunday, many Americans will extend the yearly tradition of watching the last two NFL teams compete for the coveted Vince Lombardi Trophy. As a loyal Philadelphia Eagles fan myself, I am not too interested in the game this year, since it features the LA Rams and the Cincinnati Bengals. What I am excited about most is the halftime show - this year featuring Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Mary J. Blige, and Kendrick Lamar. 

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Blog Feature

Instructional Coaching  |  Virtual Learning

Shifts in Professional Learning: more microlearning and virtual courses

School district leaders face the enormous challenge of understanding and responding to how professional learning has been impacted by the global pandemic. This at a time when professional learning is so critical for educators who are navigating uncertainties around in-person consistency, increasing responsibilities, and shifting instructional modalities.

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Blog Feature

Curriculum Strategy & Adoption  |  Personalized Learning

Using Local History to Increase Student Engagement

Erin Conklin’s eyes light up when she talks about the primary and secondary source student book she created for Duval County Public School’s African American Studies elective.

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Blog Feature

Curriculum Strategy & Adoption  |  Personalized Learning

Relevant content makes personalizing learning easier

When I was a teacher in Washington, D.C. I taught a class on local history. Students got to learn about places they had visited and people they had heard about. I’ve never taught a class where students were more deeply engaged in the actual content of the class. 

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Teacher Retention  |  Teachers

Three Strategies to Support Our Teacher Workforce in 2022

This past December, I found myself at home watching Dick Clark’s New Years Rockin’ Eve on ABC. Across the variety of hosts, musical performances, and crowd interviews - one theme emerged through the night: everyone is hoping that 2022 will be better than 2021.    2021 will no doubt be remembered as a challenging year, not uniquely, but especially in the field of education. Year two of the pandemic caused countless school closings, brought social and political unrest to school board meetings, and further stressed an already fragile educator workforce. Adding to an educator labor shortage that started with the Great Recession in 2007, we witnessed a net loss of more than half a million education jobs this past year.   

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Blog Feature

Organizational Leadership & Change Management

A New Word for the New Year

I live in the Midwest, and if you could see my garden now, well…let’s just say, there is nothing but brown stalks, and wet muddy leaves beneath the snow.  If I told you that in a few months, my yard would be resplendent with daffodils, hyacinth, bleeding heart and bee balm, you couldn’t tell from what you see now. But I know it’s coming. 

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Blog Feature

Teams & Culture

Team Habits with a Big Impact

We’ve all been there. The room, half empty. Little to no conversation happening between the seated rows. Most eyes fixed on laptop screens, phone screens, projector screen, likely checking email or “checking email.” Everyone waiting for the session to begin in hopes of getting a nugget of information that makes the workshop registration worth the investment. Sadly, this is the reality of many educational workshops and conferences from leadership to technology to a focus on instruction. I’ve experienced it and I’m guessing you have too. If only there was an experience that provided meaningful takeaways that could be implemented at your own pace in order to make much needed changes to your organization and culture. This was my experience with the New School Rules Leadership Institute.

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Blog Feature

Education Elements  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management

5 Major Predictions for 2022

In 2021 we navigated a lot of change and ambiguity. Life felt at times, hectic and unpredictable, but there was also a slowing down. There were shortages; so we waited longer for everything from household supplies to PCR tests. We saw inflation creep up, and so we waited to buy things; and, we changed our purchasing habits. Stores and restaurants reduced hours due to staffing issues and lowered demand. So while there was great uncertainty, this slowing down also made many families question everything from where they wanted to live, to the types of jobs they wanted to have, to their values and how they want their children educated.

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Blog Feature

Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  Strategic Planning  |  Teachers

Are you a goal-setter or a goal-getter?

While I was teaching 9th grade English Language Arts, one of my mentor teachers shared the concept of the “Big Hairy Audacious Goal” (BHAG) with me. Beyond a SMART goal, it’s a goal that you might collaboratively set – that is big, important, and maybe even a little bit of a stretch. That terminology clearly stuck with me (I think it was the hairy part – sorry, it’s now stuck with you as well). 

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Blog Feature

Surveys

Student & Teacher Perception Surveys: Elevating Stakeholder Voice for 20 Years

In the fall of 2005, I sat down at my desk in Mr. Powers’ 11th-grade history class and was asked to complete a survey. This was an interesting and surprising development, as no one in my 12 years of schooling had thought to ask my opinion about anything. The survey instructions asked me to consider my experience in Mr. Powers’ class. A notoriously methodical test taker from kindergarten through graduate school, I thought long and hard about each item. I did think Mr. Powers cared about me. I did find his class interesting. He did not ask me to explain my thinking behind my answers. 

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Blog Feature

Strategic Planning

The Importance of Involving Stakeholders Throughout the Strategic Planning Process

To see students and community members in action - that is the stuff we, as educators, dream about. Most recently in a suburban school district outside of Cincinnati, Ohio. My teammates, Megan Campion and Briana Cash, and I got to host community gatherings over the course of two-days with two in-person and two virtual sessions. These experiences confirmed the belief that districts should bring groups of people together to discuss and define the next strategic plan whether it’s a combination of virtual or in-person experiences. 

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Innovative Leadership  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  School Leadership

Why We Need Elements of Leadership

This past September, Education Elements conducted a Leadership Pulse Check Survey of school leaders throughout the country. The results indicated a collective and hopeful outlook, despite the fact that we are living in such challenging and unprecedented times, where our needs and constraints shift on a regular basis.

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Blog Feature

Instructional Coaching  |  Personalized Learning  |  Professional Development

What Bonsai Trees and Wildflowers Teach us about Personalized Learning

To many in the gardening and plant world, bonsais are among the most impressive trees. Bonsai is seen as a blend of gardening and art – a way to create living sculptures. A gardener might spend decades pruning the tree, little by little, year over year, so that it grows to the gardener’s exact vision. For instance, a Coast Redwood tree that, in the wild might grow to 100’-200’, may only grow to 1’ under the curated, decades-long care of the gardener.   Recently I was listening to a podcast, where Julie Lythcott-Haims – author of best selling books on helping young people become healthy and happy adults, and former Dean of Freshmen and Undergraduate Advising at Stanford University – applied the concept of growing bonsai trees to the way parents raise their children.  She shared:

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Blog Feature

Instructional Coaching  |  School Leadership  |  Teachers  |  Teams & Culture

Developing Yourself as an Instructional Coach

I became an instructional coach because I wanted to share my expertise with my colleagues, so that more of our students were reaching higher, and achieving greater. I spent six years in the classroom, perfecting my craft as an early elementary educator. So, I thought my experience plus my graduate degree was all I needed to be an effective coach. Oh, how little I knew.

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Blog Feature

How to Prioritize Relationships to Retain Educators For Equity

Hiring is often perceived as a heavy lift; and retaining and engaging great educators is proving to be a challenge. And, while administrators are focused on how to handle the needs and matters for all students, there is a tendency to forget and even overlook the needs of the staff. But truly supporting staff - and understanding their unique needs is critical to increase engagement, retention, and to effectively model how we can best support our students.

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Blog Feature

School Districts  |  Strategic Planning

The Gold Medalist’s Guide for Incorporating Reflection in your Strategic Plan

“The twisties”. Growing up in the competitive cheerleading circuit, I was familiar with the term (and even had a former coach experience them once and never attempt certain gymnastics passes again), but I had never heard the term outside of that space...until this year’s Summer Olympics. 

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Blog Feature

Personalized Learning  |  School Leadership  |  Teachers

Core Four of Personalizing Learning

  In 2014 Education Elements first introduced the Core Four, later publishing the “Core Four of Personalized Learning: The Elements You Need to Succeed” in 2016. Since its publication, this white paper has been downloaded over 3,000 times by educators across the world. The Core Four is our team’s most widely-recognized collateral. It is often the first resource we share with educators, it has been cited in research and position papers, and it has been adopted and customized by school districts. 

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Blog Feature

From Strategic Planning to Strategic Practice: Three Key Actions to Keep in Mind

Strategic planning is the process of setting short and long-term goals, deciding on actions to achieve those goals and assembling the teams and resources needed to take those actions. Districts of all sizes benefit from developing a long range plan that formalizes the district’s mission, vision, values, goals, and objectives, while engaging the community, with the ultimate goal of both improving operational efficiency and providing an exceptional educational experience for all stakeholders.

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Blog Feature

Personalized Learning

Personalizing Learning: The Goal is Student Ownership

Think back to when you had a deep sense of ownership in your learning; a time when you went above and beyond the expectations because of your own curiosity or passion. For me, this was in seventh grade during a career exploration project. I wanted to be an architect, and I not only wrote a report about the profession, but I created an entire imagined autobiography of myself as an accomplished architect, complete with sketches of a model home. The flexibility of the project made it meaningful in a way worksheets and textbooks never could. I was able to explore a passion and, in the process, better understand myself.

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Equity  |  School Leadership

Leading with Equity: How to Take the First Steps

I believe that ALL students, especially Black and Brown students, deserve an academically rigorous education that affords them opportunities and experiences that will prepare them to lead a successful life. That said, inequity and disparity exist within our educational system that prevents that from occurring, which is why, among other reasons, it is critical to lead with equity. 

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Blog Feature

Personalized Learning  |  School Districts  |  School Leadership

Personalizing Learning: Targeted Instruction

In our earlier versions of our Core Four of Personalized Learning, targeted instruction was primarily a teacher action separated from another Core Four element, data driven decision making. We recognize that this limited the potential impact that targeted instruction could have to personalize learning for students. As an exclusively teacher action, it missed the opportunity to empower students to advocate for themselves. And separated from data driven decisions, there was a disconnect between two components that go hand-in-hand to help teachers and students design learning experiences tailored for individuals and groups of students.

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How Leaders Can Prioritize Hiring For Equity In This Moment

As a 25 year veteran in education leadership, I can't remember when hiring has never not been a thing. Every year brings sometimes significant turnover in teaching staff, and leaders come and go as superintendencies shift. But as is true in so many other domains, this year is markedly different.    In January 2021, school leaders across the country were hopeful that the pandemic would have been entirely behind us. And by July 2021 with the rates of people contracting COVID-19, the new Delta and Lambda variants, the reality is that  COVID is most certainly not behind us. With the increased responsibilities for educators brought on by the pandemic and health concerns, there has been a rise in retirements, resignations and vacancy postings. And as is also so often the case in education, the classrooms and schools that are impacted the most are those that are historically highest in need, serving our most vulnerable student populations.   

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Personalized Learning

Personalizing Learning: Collaboration & Creativity

Two common misconceptions about personalized learning are that it requires technology and that it must involve significantly more independent work. We know instinctively that a room full of students working silently on computers is not necessarily personalized, even though there are powerful digital tools and programs that can make personalized learning simpler. And yet, an adaptive program still requires a teacher to facilitate learning that empowers students and builds their ownership of learning.

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District Leadership  |  Social and Emotional Learning

Success Starts with Heart: How Chicago Public Schools Centered Identity, Relationships, and Community to Welcome Back Students This School Year

Every first day of school is a new opportunity for a fresh start. As the first day of the 2021-2022 school year approached, teachers across the country were grappling with the question: How do I start fresh when faced with so much uncertainty?

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Personalized Learning

Personalizing Learning: Flexible Pace & Path

In 2014, Education Elements promoted the notion of "Integrated Digital Content" as a core component of blended learning. In 2017 we changed this term to “Flexible Content and Tools,” recognizing that both online and offline content have an important role to play when personalizing learning. This change also represented a shift from blended learning, which focuses on the integration of technology into the classroom, to personalized learning, which is an instructional approach that empowers students to build ownership of their learning, making sure they get the instruction they need, when they need it. This year, we are taking things one step further by introducing “Flexible Path and Pace.”

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Classrooms  |  Personalized Learning  |  Teachers

Personalizing Learning: Reflection and Goal-Setting

Reflection and goal-setting is the simplest way to begin personalizing learning because it mirrors a practice we engage in every day of our lives. Sometimes this shows up in small ways, like aiming to show gratitude more often, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or reading more. Technology is playing a larger role in this practice, especially as it applies to our health. This can be as simple as checking your steps on a smartwatch to signing-up for an exercise and diet app. We reflect and set-goals at church, in a therapy session, at the gym, when we go shopping, or around the dinner table. It is one primary format in which we aim to improve ourselves. And it’s one reason why reflection and goal-setting is often the first step educators take to personalize learning.

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Instructional Coaching  |  Professional Development

Secret Lessons and Common Pitfalls from a Former Instructional Coach

With an influx of ESSER funds, many districts are choosing to invest in instructional coach positions. That’s not just a recent trend. From 2000 to 2015, the number of coaches in school districts doubled. It makes sense - multiple research studies point to strong evidence for increased quality of instruction and improvements in student achievement as a result of instructional coaching. In fact, a meta-analysis of 60 randomized controlled trials that looked at students’ standardized tests scores and teacher instructional practices found that coaching had a greater impact than most school-based interventions (e.g., pre-service training, student incentives, merit-based pay, generic professional development, data-driven instruction, and extended learning time).

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District Leadership  |  Teacher Retention

How to Onboard Teachers Better

Across the country teachers are welcoming students into their classrooms, as schools are welcoming new teachers to their teams. These teachers - new to the profession, early career and veterans - are starting at schools while conditions remain unprecedented and unpredictable. Despite this reality, school and district leaders are tasked with onboarding their staff such that school, and learning can continue for as many students as possible.    

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District Leadership  |  Strategic Planning

5 User-Centered Strategies: Connect with your community and build a better strategic plan

Your favorite apps that seem to make managing life easier, social media sites that connect you to stories that resonate, shopping at your favorite store, your go-to streaming service when you need to de-stress - sometimes it feels like these things were built in a way that just ‘gets you.’    This didn’t happen by accident; this happened by design. 

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Data  |  Decision-Making  |  District Leadership  |  School Districts  |  School Leadership

How Bias Affects Our Perceptions of Data: 3 ways to guard against unconscious bias

It’s that time of year again - we’re shopping for school supplies, teachers are returning to their classrooms, and students (as well as their parents) are eagerly awaiting the news as to who their teachers will be. As a parent of two school-aged boys, it’s also the time of year our family starts making predictions about the year ahead. “I think Miles will do so much better in reading this year.” “Taylor is probably going to get in trouble a lot, but maybe he’ll also test into the gifted program.”  It’s an innocent practice in anticipating the successes and struggles we’ll experience in the year ahead, but without knowing it, we’re also shaping how we will perceive these experiences as the year unfolds. 

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Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  Teams & Culture

Habits that Drive Great Teams

Early in my career, when I was a middle school science teacher in Charlotte, North Carolina, I didn’t think that the ritual of shaking my students’ hands, fist bumping, or hugging my students as they entered our classroom meant anything. But now, I realize it’s the opposite. The repetitive habit of checking in with your team means everything. It’s a signal that your team is paying attention to the whole being of others, focusing on the little things, caring about the unity of the team, and so much more. 

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Education Elements  |  Professional Development

What Type of Facilitator Are You? Understanding Your Strengths to Improve Professional Development

There’s a line from You’ve Got Mail (yes, I’ve seen it hundreds of times) where Tom Hanks says, “Don’t you just love New York in the Fall? It makes me want to buy school supplies. I would send you a bouquet of newly sharpened pencils if I knew your name and address.”  If you’re an educator, September makes you think of new backpacks, colorful pens, clean lunch boxes. If you’re an instructional coach, principal, or most central office staff members, July and August probably make you think of Back to School Professional Development and New Teacher Training. A little less sparkly than Lisa Frank, but alas, here we are. 

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District Leadership  |  Teacher Retention  |  Teams & Culture

Leveraging Candidate Profiles to Improve Teacher Retention in 4 Steps

A recent survey of more than 1,000 districts found that nearly two-thirds of districts are reporting teacher shortages heading into the 2021-2022 school year. To plug or refill leaks in this draining teacher pool, districts are increasingly leveraging stimulus funding to enact short-term solutions such as incentives and signing bonuses. But the foundational cracks in the teacher pool and pipeline are deep, widespread and found at every phase of the teacher lifecycle. We need to reassess and reimagine the way we engage and support teachers at every stage of this journey, and we can start by looking at the candidate profiles that drive our recruitment, hiring and onboarding.

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Education Elements  |  Equity  |  Teams & Culture

Why I Joined the Ed Elements Team

In my 22 years in the K-12 education profession, I have worked for, and led organizations that run the gamut - from those that are very process and compliance driven, to those that multiply and engage creativity. And yet, after experiencing, what some consider the ultimate freedom of being my own boss, I am excitedly joining the Education Elements team. 

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Coaches  |  School Leadership  |  Teams & Culture

Four Types of Learning Walks for Every School Leader

Everyone's first year at a new school comes with growing pains -- no matter if it’s their first role as a new Principal, or their 25th year opening a new, or newly redesigned school. One approach is particularly useful at helping to alleviate the growing pains - a “secret sauce” of sorts. 

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On Self-Care and Leadership

With summer break already in progress for most school districts, leaders can finally plan a week or two to step away from the daily grind and have a chance just to be. But if you are like me, this is not as easy as it sounds.  When most of our time is dictated by a calendar of events, meetings, to-do’s, and small pockets of time to focus on family and friends, genuinely unplugging can be challenging.

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Coaches  |  Personalized Learning  |  School Leadership

Learning Journeys, Learning Stories: Re-envisioning Instructional Learning Walks

There isn’t a lot of convincing you need to do to get these two former English teachers talking about the power of stories. Whether it was unpacking The Danger of a Single Story, weaving together narratives into a photo essay about the Children’s Crusade, or crafting original 6 word memoirs, our classrooms were built around stories.  Stories are a powerful tool to connect, teach, and inspire. Organizations are full of complexities and oftentimes making sense of that complexity is daunting. Our classrooms are full of stories, but often we don’t have opportunities beyond quick anecdotes in passing to share them with our colleagues. 

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Education Elements  |  Equity  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management

Where Change Begins

I was recently struck by a piece by Elena Aguilar, the “coach’s coach,” about acting in one’s sphere of influence to create change. She writes that when looking at making change in the world, the best place to start is within one’s sphere of influence. In other words, systemic change is not just a collective responsibility, it’s also an individual responsibility.

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District Leadership  |  School Districts

5 Ways To Get on Top of the Education Recovery

Across school systems and around the globe, the pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on students. Some have thrived in online learning environments, while others have suffered from low-quality or interrupted learning — often with disastrous results. As the economy begins to rebound and educators work toward creating a new post-pandemic normal, these disparities in learning are likely to become amplified, resulting in a K-shaped recovery with a widening gap between those who are succeeding and those who are struggling, according to a new report “K-Shaped Education Recovery” by ISTE and Education Elements.

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Decision-Making  |  District Leadership  |  Strategic Planning

Built with Good Intentions: What a bridge in Honduras can teach us about coming back from the pandemic

There’s a bridge in Choluteca, Honduras. It spans nearly 500 meters long, but it isn’t well known for its size or even because it is one of the only replicas of the Golden Gate bridge still in existence. Nor is it known for its importance in connecting traffic in Central America. Rather, the new Choluteca Bridge became famous as the “Bridge to Nowhere.” 

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District Leadership  |  Innovative Leadership  |  Teams & Culture

Three Types of Leaders Every Learning Organization Should Have

One of the best things about living your professional life in education is the assumption implicit in the field that everyone has something valuable to contribute, and there is always an opportunity to level up. Over the past year, we have seen this belief confirmed in classrooms, virtual classrooms, schools, and districts all over the country as teachers, counselors, campus administrators, and district leaders have taken on challenges and shifted the way school happens with no notice, little training, and endlessly changing demands and limitations.  

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Innovative Leadership  |  Return Planning  |  Strategic Planning

Take it or leave it: lessons learned about strategic planning during a global pandemic

More than a year ago, I - like many others - was hunkering down for what I thought would be a two-week quarantine. Thirteen months later, I have found myself adapting to my circumstances. I have created a comfortable work-from-home space, embraced many home DIY projects. I’ve started a herb garden, purchased a inflatable baby pool (I don’t have a baby) and I have had enough time to get in and out of shape...multiple times. I have learned a whole lot about things I never questioned before “the great pause.” For instance, my perception of time is completely arbitrary: some days seem never-ending while in others, 24 hours do not feel like enough. I’ve also rediscovered the magic of a full-night’s sleep and what a blessing and privilege it is to have my health. There are some things I plan to forever eliminate from my life (I’m looking at you, non-stretchy jeans) and some things I hope to incorporate in the next phase of life (hello, neighborhood walks). I am also seeing many district partners grapple with the tensions of identifying what we want to take with us and leave behind in our next phase. 

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Post-Pandemic Possibilities for School

About a year ago, we dealt with one of the largest supply shortages we've faced as a modern country. While toilet paper was certainly in high demand, it was actually active dry yeast that had people scrambling. New and aspiring bakers that found themselves with additional time at home were inspired to learn a new skill: how to make homemade bread amidst the backdrop of a global pandemic.

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Crisis Management  |  District Leadership  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  School Leadership  |  Teams & Culture

Re-energizing Yourself and Your Team for the Work Ahead

We have been reading, discussing, and reflecting quite a bit on the topic of leadership recently, and one of the products of this deep dive is a video series all about what leaders have learned this year. In his interview, Dr. Patrick Ward from Mayfield City Schools in Ohio mused on the fact that school leaders are trained to manage acute crises, but for the past year they have been managing a chronic crisis, with several acute crises emerging as the chronic crisis continued. We’ve been thinking about the phrase “chronic crisis” and drawing from some inspiring resources to consider the best way to rally your community through it. With the end of the school year in sight, now is the time to re-energize your teams so you can finish strong.  To do that, you need to address three interrelated dimensions: Emotions, Mindsets, and Behaviors. 

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Personalized Learning  |  School Districts  |  Schooling Loss  |  Virtual Learning

3 Ways to Incorporate Flexibility into Planning for School Next Year

This school year made clear the need to redesign our existing systems to ensure that meaningful learning can continue even when our brick and mortar school buildings close. Most schools and districts had only days to prepare to close school buildings and move learning to students’ homes. Fast forward 12 months and remote learning has had time to grow from an emergency measure to a format of learning that invites growth and innovation in new ways. So how can you ensure that meaningful learning can happen anywhere?

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District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Virtual Learning

What is Schooling Loss – and How Will You Approach it?

Our team has spent months discussing the best term to use to describe the challenge education currently faces. We brought it up in team meetings, shared it with district partners, and sought out recent publications on the subject. We came together around five beliefs that helped us choose the term “schooling loss”:

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Remote Work  |  School Leadership  |  Teacher Retention

4 Practices to Immediately Improve the Teacher Experience in Your School

There are 88 million opportunities in the human genome for trait variations to make us unique, but when it comes to what we seek in the workplace, neuroscience suggests most humans crave the same three things – safety, belonging, and a sense of mattering. This is hardly news; Abraham Maslow wrote about these same needs in his 1943 paper on human motivation, and a quick scan of nearly any company’s Glassdoor reviews will highlight these variables.  The past year challenged the way nearly every organization approached these needs. Lack of personal connection, the inability to ‘disconnect’ from work, and whose health and safety are prioritized rank among a laundry list of complaints with today’s employee experience. And when it comes to the field of education, the pandemic doubled down on pre-existing conditions within the teacher experience. 

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Shine Bright Like a Diamond: Supporting Students with a Justice Lens

Like many this past year, I suffered the effects of deprivation from proximity – that is to say, I miss humans. It was this dearth of face-to-face interaction that led me, quite fortuitously, to reach out to Brittany Barnett, founder and president of the nonprofit organization Girls Embracing Mothers [GEM] to seek out volunteering opportunities. Renowned criminal justice advocate, decorated corporate lawyer, and best-selling author, Brittany is a force of nature. After experiencing the incarceration of her mother, Brittany says, “I found this heightened sense of compassion and empathy in me that I never knew toward a group of people we were often taught to stereotype and ignore – people in prison. Her incarceration impacted me deeply.” She was inspired to start the GEM program as a means of connecting girls with their incarcerated mothers through facilitated monthly visits and ongoing systems of support like character cultivation workshops and events. With the COVID shutdown and cessation of prison visits, Brittany and her team have responded by pivoting to a monthly virtual curriculum where the girls are able to connect with one another, process their experience around maternal incarceration, and gain the tools necessary to lead successful and empowered lives. Much like we at Education Elements help decision-makers in the K-12 sphere reimagine systems of education, Brittany seeks to reimagine systems of justice and, through a multi-pronged approach, to specifically address the following question: “How do we work to really empower girls, especially girls from multi-marginalized communities to embrace their voice, amplify their voice and empower them to soar?” 

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Data  |  District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Strategic Planning

Planning for Change with Data: Lessons Learned from Spring Break

I’m writing this blog during a 17-hour road trip that was supposed to be a 2-hour flight. My husband and I wanted to take our two boys skiing for spring break and have spent the last several months meticulously planning the perfect trip. I booked all of the fun activities, and he dusted off our equipment and bargain shopped for winter clothing. We found the perfect, non-stop flight that would minimize the frustrations of traveling with two young kids. And then mother nature brought the 4th largest snowstorm on record to Denver, Colorado. Thousands of flights were canceled, including ours. Lucky for us, my husband’s superpower is that he can quickly pivot to accommodate change. Without hesitation, he loaded our already packed suitcases into the car, strapped the skis to the roof, and here we are, well on our way to the vacation we hoped for.

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District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Teams & Culture

Practice Makes Purposeful Habits: Three Essential Practices for Lasting Change

Leading change, whether systemic or individual, requires strong habits. Last month I had the opportunity to chat with Greg Carlson, Founder of Leading Well, about how to create purposeful habits, and how strong habits can help one move from reactive and ad-hoc motions to strategic and lasting practices. From our conversation came three essential practices which together create a framework for lasting change – whether working to improve the physical and mental wellness of a single educator, or to create a thriving culture in your school system.  At Education Elements and Leading Well, we believe that through alignment to purpose, consistency, and continuous improvement we can continually strive to realize our goals. What follows is a synopsis of our reflections on leading change through purposeful habits.  

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School Leadership  |  Teachers  |  Virtual Learning

Making the Case for Transforming Summer School

For most of us, summer school was a punishment for not passing a class. Sure, plenty of teachers (including myself) framed it as a second opportunity or a chance for more individual support. But at the end of the day, the hours spent in summer school are hours not spent working, looking after siblings, or just socializing.  Especially in secondary grades, the primary – if not exclusive – purpose of summer school is credit recovery. Amidst increasing calls not to fail students during a pandemic, an opportunity arises: what could the purpose of summer school be if it wasn’t about credit recovery? This question becomes even more salient as educators consider how to address the time students have lost with teachers and classmates because of COVID closures and challenges with distance learning.

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Competency-Based Education  |  School Leadership

Redesign Learning Experiences by Rethinking Time with Competency-Based Education

Time is weird right now. Hours can feel like months, weeks can feel like days, and a year into a global pandemic feels both like an eon and a few seconds at the same time. Regardless of how we perceive time or how much time has actually elapsed since school days shifted from 3D to 2D learning, we know that our students have coped with this complex time in a myriad of ways. Some have thrived, others have been barely keeping it together. Still others we might have lost touch with altogether. And that variety and variability of student experiences since March 2020 make it challenging to imagine how to teach when the next normal begins.  The question we must ask ourselves becomes: when we open our school doors to all students again, will we revert back to standard operating procedures? Or will we take this seismic shakeup in the status quo to shift our practice to something more responsive, more equitable, and more student-centered? Let’s opt for the latter. 

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District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Strategic Planning

Rethinking Your District Strategic Plan in the Era of COVID-19

What’s the first word that pops into your head when you hear “strategic planning”? What word did you think of? Common responses we hear are boring, painful, old-school, far-off, or even just a simple, “ugh.”

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Data  |  School Leadership

Starting and Sustaining a Data Habit in Your School

Knowledge is Power! Measure what Matters!  If our cliches are an indicator, we all know that data collection, review, analysis, and understanding is important. We all hear of data-driven decisions, and the importance of data in education and educational systems, but we are often challenged to incorporate data review and the next steps into our everyday lives. As we’ve been exploring the Essential Elements of a Data Culture, we’ve been considering how an organizational culture can shift from a culture in which data is in the periphery, pulled to the center for high stakes discussions and decisions, to one in which data is an integral part of every day, informing the small moves that reinforce the vision, clarify decisions, and advance progress.  This is where our love of habits comes in…

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New School Design  |  School Leadership  |  Virtual Learning

Leadership Questions to Help Guide Design of a Virtual School

To support the planning of opening a virtual school, leaders can be overwhelmed with the volume of questions to consider — logistics, strategy, and purpose to name a few. To guide the planning process, we offer the following table with phases of implementation with related questions. While the guide is set up sequentially, each phase may trigger a deeper articulation of previous phases to refine or reimagine the virtual school. 

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District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Teacher Retention

How to Create a Positive Teacher Experience in Your School

A few Fridays ago I got a message from my colleague Kelly. She asked what I wanted for lunch, said she would order it, and that we would eat together during our Zoom meeting later that day (where we would begin to reimagine what summer school could look like). This simple and thoughtful act changed my mood in the moment and for the rest of that day.  

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District Leadership  |  Equity  |  School Leadership

Meet Educators Addressing Inequities & Breaking Barriers in Their Schools & Districts

In September of 2020, Education Elements announced the first cohort of the “Systems for Education Equity Development," or SEED, Fellowship. The fellowship is an exclusive, multi-month, cohort experience for educational leaders to redesign a system within their school district that is contributing to creating inequity in the student experience. The inaugural SEED Fellowship cohort is a powerful group of educators made of leaders across 7 states including the District of Columbia, Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Washington. Individually they are amazing, and together and through the SEED experience, the fellows will have an additional set of tools as well as a network of support to address their local, systemic challenges around equity. 

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Data  |  District Leadership  |  School Leadership

A Four Step Process for Developing Data Culture in School Districts

For more than a century, standardized testing data have been used to measure the success of students, teachers, and schools - and even to mark our global competitiveness or lack thereof. These data have driven significant education policy and funding models at the national and state levels, and school districts devote up to 15 percent of their instructional days each school year to student assessments alone, costing an estimated $1.7 billion each year. The political and financial commitment to standardized testing was born out of good intentions. The incredibly high stakes for students, teachers, and schools that were tied to these data were intended to hold us accountable for educating all children. But the return on these investments is debatable at best. We know now that standardized testing data, when viewed in isolation, represent a limited view of student success and can even mislead us into making discriminatory decisions because of their inherent biases. We know the policies we’ve enforced and the decisions we’ve made based on these data have failed to close persistent achievement disparities across income levels and between white students and students of color, even after 50 years of trying.

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District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Virtual Learning

Slow Pivots — What’s Driving the Change to Reimagine School Schedules?

School schedules and use of time are one of the few remaining relics of the industrialized learning model. Even when most schools moved to virtual learning in March 2020, many organizations replicated the existing bell schedule and instructed teachers to move their onsite instruction online. The school leaders believed it would hold teachers and students more accountable and create more predictability to help families plan their own schedules.  But pre-pandemic, some schools began to look across the systems that were set up and consider more flexible and agile options that were more in tune with designing learning that is more compelling, personalized, and appropriately challenging for their students.

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Personalized Learning

3 Questions That Drive Virtual School Excellence

Virtual schools in the K-12 environment have been a popular topic for discussion for many years. Recently I have noticed an increased level of interest by online charter school leaders, district- or state-run virtual schools, and program leaders in regards to how they can improve their virtual schools. Almost ironically, I also find myself having frequent conversations about virtual school opportunities with brick-and-mortar school leaders. With many school districts adopting blended learning as a major priority

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Crisis Management  |  School Leadership  |  Virtual Learning

Addressing Schooling Loss in Schools With These Four Strategies

Learning loss is the baby elephant in the room. It’s an issue that is currently small enough to briefly acknowledge, deprioritize, or ignore completely. Yet this elephant will continue to grow as the size and scale of learning loss due to the pandemic is better understood. The vaccine has returned a sense of hope that life will get back to “normal.” But educators must recognize that a return to “normal” will only reinforce the widening opportunity gap and systems that support institutionalized racism. Instead, structural changes will need to be made if learning loss is to truly be addressed. This conversation is critical as schools transition from virtual learning to in-person (and maybe back) this year, and begin planning for the summer and 2021-22 school year.

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Crisis Management  |  District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Virtual Learning

Virtual Schooling Is Here to Stay: Reimagining Post-Pandemic Virtual Learning in Public Schools

From North Carolina to California to Alaska, public schools around the United States are planning to preserve a virtual school option for students after the pandemic is over. The constant drumbeat of getting all students back to school as quickly as possible does not tell the whole story of learning in the pandemic. Singing the praises of virtual learning was not something many students, educators, and families would see themselves humming along to twelve months ago. But from the early and draining days, there has been a rhythm and stability that has flourished in expected and unexpected ways.

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District Leadership  |  Equity  |  School Leadership

Opening the Door For Inclusion: A Guide

At the beginning of last week, my colleagues Purvi Patel, Dave Hardy, and I were excited to welcome leaders participating in our inaugural cohort of the Systems of Educational Equity Development (SEED) Fellowship after a well-deserved break and launch the beginning of our INCLUDE sessions. 

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Crisis Management  |  Innovative Leadership  |  Teachers

Inspiration from the Resilience of Educators

As we watched the events at the Capitol unfold on January 6th, like many, our team jumped into crisis response mode. A planned all-day, company-wide training and retreat was canceled, as we checked in on teammates in the D.C. area, and reached out to partners, family, and friends to see how we might support them. We created safe spaces for each other to debrief and discuss, find some comfort amid the uncertainty, and pause on our to-do lists for the day if needed. Once the initial shock wore off and the flurry of activity wound down, I was sitting glued to my screen, constantly refreshing my feeds. I’d already passed the point where my mind was begging for a break from the news, needing time and space to process what I was seeing, but I’m the person at Education Elements who’s responsible for our social media channels (👋🏽) – this is what I do! Sad and overwhelmed, I remarked to my team, ‘This is one of the few times I’m not happy to be “the social media person”’. I had no idea that by the end of the night, I couldn’t disagree more with those words if I tried.

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Innovative Leadership

Reflecting on Your Leadership Through a Year of Unexpected Firsts

2020 was, among many things, a year of firsts. The first time a non-English language movie, Parasite, won Best Picture at the Oscars. The first time millions of people stopped their daily commute and set up a home office, classroom, or waited to resume their jobs and typical routines. The first Black Vice President, the first Asian-American Vice President, and the first female Vice President elected in the United States – Senator Kamala Harris. The first time for many people homeschooling their children, and for children to be attending school virtually. The first time a female athlete scored in a Power 5 Conference game in NCAA football (Sarah Fuller, Vanderbilt), the first female NFL coach to make it to the Superbowl (Katie Sowers, 49ers), and the first female General Manager appointed in the MLB (Kim Ng, Marlins). The first time Hallmark released a holiday movie with an LGBTQ storyline, The Christmas House. The first time one of the most commonly uttered phrases of the year was, “You’re on mute.” And, of course, the first time for most people to live through a global pandemic and navigate an unprecedented amount of disruption and change.  While 2020 was a year of many firsts, there are a few things that we can count on to persist in 2021 and beyond. We can expect that unexpected change is a constant. We can expect that genuine connection is a basic human need. And we can expect that innovative, empathetic, and inclusive leaders are essential in guiding teams and individuals through whatever challenges and opportunities the future holds.

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District Leadership  |  Innovative Leadership  |  Personalized Learning  |  School Leadership  |  Teams & Culture  |  Virtual Learning

Education Predictions for an Unpredictable 2021

I got started with this tradition of predictions in 2010 after reading Disrupting Class, a book by Clayton Christensen and Michael Horn. In their book, they predicted that by 2019, 50% of all high school courses will be online in some blended learning model. That was a pretty bold prediction in 2008 when the book was published, but their model for cycles of innovation seems pretty accurate now that we have hindsight. Even as of May 2019, there were people pointing out the failure of this prediction. Now at the end of 2020, I’d estimate that +95% of all K-12 students took some form of an online class, and most likely this trend will continue into 2021.

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Education Elements

How Responsiveness Led Us Through 2020 - and the Past Decade

Whoa. 2020. I became a mom this year. My daughter Emily Ruth was born on April 1, 2020. My husband and I knew immediately that she was going to be a mix of wicked and wise, given the birthday she chose: April Fools Day - so perfect for 2020. She was born 2 weeks into the first COVID lockdown, and 4 days after my labor had started (she was in no rush to enter into these circumstances). So I spent all of April, May, and June hunkered down in a bubble of love and sleeplessness with my newborn, while the world outside was descending into the scariness and unknown of COVID.

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Remote Work  |  School Leadership  |  Teachers

Teachers and Burnout: What to Do When You Can’t Change the World

It’s December. We made it to the end of 2020 – a spectacularly stressful year, no matter who you are, what you do, or where you live. As the months ticked by, though, it became clear that the chaos of the year placed almost unbearable levels of stress on some professions, educators among them. As schools wind down for winter break in the midst of a national spike in COVID-19 numbers, it may be a good time to deconstruct and consider burnout, what it looks like, what causes it, and what we can do about it.

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District Leadership  |  Remote Work  |  School Leadership  |  Teachers  |  Virtual Learning

Building Community Through A Virtual Road Race

This Fall, Education Elements hosted our first ever virtual Distance Learning Road Race. The rationale was simple - we wanted to create a space to promote mental and physical wellness, model best practices for virtual community building, and give back to our partners and community. Admittedly, the ‘race’ was more of a running challenge, encouraging participants to commit to running a final distance of their choosing and engage with us over six weeks of challenges between September to November.

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Equity  |  School Leadership

Redesigning for an Anti-Racist Classroom Series: #2 Discipline Policy

The systems that teachers and leaders design and implement in schools are all impacted by the biases of their designers. We have to design explicitly for our marginalized students and to do this, we need to first understand the way our own power and privilege impact what we believe is best for kids. As my colleagues wrote in Capture the Opportunity: Steps to Redesign School-Level Systems for Equity:

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School Leadership  |  Teachers  |  Virtual Learning

Returning to Distance Learning: What's Different This Time?

A known unknown is a question we are certain exists, but whose answer we are confident we cannot answer. This paradox pretty accurately sums up how many educators entered into this school year. We knew we might return to distance learning and we knew that no one could say whether that would happen, and if so, when. As COVID infection rates and hospitalizations rise across the country, the unknown answer becomes clearer; for some of us, returning to distance learning for some amount of time will happen.  AND there is good reason to assume that distance learning will be significantly better today than it was last year. This is not a new experience for educators, students, and families. Our understanding of best practices, expectations, and support systems put us in a good position to ensure learning continues regardless of the physical distance between students and teachers.

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Data  |  District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Teachers

Using Data in Schools to Learn Fast

As a new mom, I cared deeply about two things: my baby’s well-being and my sleep. I could go without showering or hot meals, but I was NOT well equipped to deal with the lack of sleep. And I was fairly lucky - my son slept about as normally as you can expect a newborn to sleep. However, any disruption in that pattern, and I immediately scrambled: “He didn’t sleep last night. I MUST try these five new things to get him back on track.” Sometimes they worked, and sometimes the shift in routine actually made things worse. My hyper-focus on the short run cues meant that I was super reactive to one piece of information but failed to take a look at the big picture. Conversely, there were times I didn’t have the energy or brainpower to try new things – I ignored the information my son was giving me because I simply didn’t know how to use the data or what to do.

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Education Elements  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  Teams & Culture

The Tale of Two Suns

The pitter-patter of toes on our wooden floors, reminiscent of a spring rain pinging against a tin roof, grow louder as they approach our bedroom door. A moment of silence occupies the space as our door slowly opens. Seconds later, we hear a soft breath pressed against my wife’s ear that says, “Good morning Mom, the sun is up.” My youngest son stumbles across the bed to nestle his buttery brown cheek against mine and mutters to me, “I love you so much, dad”. He has a way to melt his parents’ hearts first thing in the morning (and avoid being told to go back to his bed). His older brother lumbers in, stiff legs resembling the Frankenstein impression he uses to terrorize his brother at Halloween. Thankfully, he “sleeps in” until 7:45 am most days before he graces us with his presence. His deliberate steps thump against the floor as he makes his way to my side of the bed with silence and morning grumpiness. His little brother is now aware his big brother is in the room and meets him with the same daily surprise as if this is the first time they have met. Unfortunately for the little guy, his exuberance is not met with the same zeal by my oldest son who can do nothing but let his lanky seven-year-old body collapse on my chest as he tries to find his way back to sleep. 

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District Leadership  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  School Leadership

Working on Working: How to Make Deliberate Decisions that Respond to the Needs of Your Team

The Education Elements team, like the rest of the world, has been adapting to life-during-COVID-19, striving to serve our partners and our mission with a set of unplanned-for constraints. In short, we have had to walk the walk – living by our own New School Rules and practicing our best New Team Habits as we have tried to find ways to connect as a team and with our partners through times that, on a good day, could be described as turbulent. We’ve experimented with how to best operate in a virtual world, and want to share with you five lessons that we’ve learned in adapting to life during COVID-19.

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Blog Feature

Communication  |  School Leadership

What Families Need Now From the Perspective of a School Parent Liaison

This is a special blog post because not only am I interviewing an expert in family outreach but I am interviewing my mom, Aleida Goetchius, who is truly my first mentor and forever hero. This is a translation of a conversation she and I had about her role as a Parent Liaison in Northern Virginia. Aleida has been a Parent Liaison for 16 years supporting all families with a specialty in supporting families from international backgrounds who are navigating the American school system for the first time. Aleida was named the 2017 Region 4 Outstanding Hourly Employee and one of five finalists for this year's Outstanding Secondary Teacher Award in her district. In this conversation, we talk a lot about support for families in general and most specifically for international families whose first language is not English. I hope you enjoy reading this conversation as much as I enjoyed having it.

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District Leadership  |  Innovative Leadership  |  School Leadership

Our Theory of Action for Developing Innovative Leadership in Schools

At Education Elements, we know that a leader is critical in navigating a school system through change. This has become abundantly clear as we’ve navigated the COVID-19 pandemic - schools and leaders have undergone and continue to experience a period of immense uncertainty and change. School and district leaders have to rise to the occasion and lead their schools through previously unconceived circumstances almost daily. We have seen leadership emerge in the creative ways you all are celebrating students, connecting with families, and adjusting to new norms and methods of instruction. 

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Virtual Learning

Adaptations for Flexible Learning

Fenestration, in architecture, is the way windows, doors, and openings are placed and arranged on a building.  In medicine, fenestration refers to a new opening in the body made through surgery. There is another meaning of the word and it is used to describe openings in the leaves of plants. Where I live in South Florida, there are a number of plants with leaf fenestrations, perhaps the most common of which is the monstera deliciosa. Some of you might have it next to you, as it has become a very popular houseplant.  Here in the subtropics, it is planted in many people’s landscapes including my own. Some people believe that the leaves have formed holes to help the plant survive the strong winds of tropical storms and hurricanes, a common occurrence in this part of the world. Others think the leaf fenestrations exist to let sunlight filter through to “understory” leaves so that they can grow and thrive (in its natural habitat, the jungle, monstera grows like a vine up very tall trees). Each of these is a theory to explain the adaptations, but no one knows for sure. Right now, in our reality of unknowns, students, teachers, and school communities across the country are adapting too–so that the sunlight of new ideas and concepts reach every learner and the turbulent wind of changing pandemic conditions, stress, and anxiety do not prevent learners from growing and thriving.

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Blog Feature

Data  |  District Leadership

6 Common Mistakes to Avoid for a Stronger Data Culture in Schools

On January 28, 1986, the space program experienced one of its most catastrophic events to date when the Space Shuttle Challenger broke apart just over a minute after launch. All seven crew members died, including Christa McAulliffe, a school teacher who would have been the first teacher in space. If you’re familiar with the event at all, you know the accident was caused by a failed O-ring seal in the solid rocket booster.  What’s less widely known is that, according to the recently released Netflix documentary, Challenger: The Final Flight, NASA and the company that manufactured those O-rings had information available to them that day that could have led to a different outcome. For example: The O-rings were a known problem. In many of the successful launches using solid rocket boosters prior to the Challenger, there was evidence of damage to the O-rings during launch. The temperature the day of the launch was much colder (by at least 20 degrees) than typical launch days. More than one expert at the O-ring manufacturer voiced concern that the part had not been tested at that temperature and could fail. NASA made choices about the data they used that day. They went into their decision-making process with a bias (they were motivated to launch after a series of delays), and they failed to see how that bias motivated their choices and in turn influenced their behavior. In education, we make choices about our data, too.

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Equity  |  School Leadership  |  Teacher Retention

9 Things That Matter When Hiring Black Teachers

This year has exacerbated the national crisis of staffing in schools. Attrition was already a looming challenge, but with all of the changes in education this year alone teachers are leaving schools and the profession en masse. That, combined with the racial reckoning taking place this year has prompted many leaders to reflect on their hiring processes and look for ways to recruit more Black teachers. If you are looking to diversify your teacher workforce or are assessing your hiring process, here are 9 things you must consider.

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Equity  |  School Leadership  |  Teacher Retention

How to Create Equitable School Environments for Teachers of Color

We’ve talked a lot about the need to improve teacher retention. During the pandemic, teachers are feeling burned out, unsupported, and dissatisfied with their jobs and lack of recognition. A survey this summer showed that nearly 30% of teachers are more likely to leave the profession now due to the pandemic. To add to the problem, there’s been a 35% decrease in the number of college students preparing to be a teacher over the past decade. So the supply of potential teachers is going down at the same time that the demand for teachers is potentially going to skyrocket. This happens for a variety of reasons that we could spend a whole week writing about. While that problem is enough to raise some eyebrows, we want to dig in beneath the surface a bit to talk about an even more pressing problem: equity, or the lack thereof, and its impact on teacher attrition.

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District Leadership  |  Organizational Leadership & Change Management  |  Strategic Planning  |  Teachers

What Responsive Planning Looks Like in a Strong Data Culture

When I was studying research methods as part of my doctoral degree, the running joke among our professors was that they would answer every question with “It depends.” My favorite professor would answer an either/or question with “Yes.” Should I use a survey to answer these research questions? Or would interviews be better? “Yes.” So when school district leaders ask me if their data should drive their strategy, or if they should define their strategy (goals, priorities, actions) and then make decisions about data based on their strategy, my favorite answer is “Yes.” Because honestly, it’s both. Here’s what I mean.

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Communication  |  Teachers  |  Virtual Learning

A Teacher's Guide to Collaborative Family-Teacher Relationships

I moved a lot with my multi-cultural family as a kid. If you know me, you know this because I talk about it often. And this experience significantly impacted the way I view the world: I know what it means to be both a guest and a host, to speak the regional tongue fluently and not at all. If you’ve had a similar experience, then you know that it shapes you. I have seen my parents (and by extension, myself) be both locals and foreigners all in one day. These experiences have given me the gift of empathy.

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School Leadership  |  Strategic Planning

Leveraging R&D to Spark Innovation in Your School District

At the core of innovation in companies leading the way in developing solutions for the future is a Research and Development team, more commonly known as R&D. This is where insight and inspiration are translated into creative and impactful solutions. In short, R&D is the process by which an organization obtains new knowledge to develop applicable solutions to present or future challenges. Companies leverage R&D for the following primary goals:

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District Leadership  |  School Leadership  |  Strategic Planning

Three Retrospectives We Love for Reflecting on Return Planning

Across the country, students have returned to school, whether it’s in-person, virtually, or in a hybrid model. The work districts and teams did over the summer is now in action: you’re following new protocols for safety, implementing curriculum changes, and leveraging new systems for instruction and communication. Whether it feels like things are going smoothly or you’re barely keeping your head above water, now is the time to pause and reflect. 

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Classrooms  |  Teachers

Reliable Learning Models for Hectic Times in Schools

School boards across the country are experiencing marathon meetings as they listen to hours and hours of public comment, review guidance from local health officials, and review plans for what it will look like to bring students back to buildings and on what timeline. Some districts have already returned to in-person learning, only to transition back to distance learning when there is an unfortunate increase in COVID-19 transmission rates.

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Blog Feature

District Leadership  |  Innovative Leadership  |  School Leadership

Making Your Next Pivot? Decide Deliberately and Communicate Effectively

Typically in times of uncertainty, organizations tend to shift their focus to getting results fast, maintaining order, and ensuring safety. These actions make sense to avoid the complexity that’s being thrown their way, however, it prevents organizations from using the time to lean in and learn from the experience. In June 2020, a team at Education Elements outlined how they were seeing their team and district partners increase agility and heighten their ability to prioritize a culture of learning even while navigating the unknown.

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Virtual Learning

Creative Solutions for Continuity of Learning: Navigating the Needs of Students, Parents/Guardians, and Teachers

“It’s all happening!” –Penny Lane, Almost Famous  This month, those of us who love the movie Almost Famous got to feel really old as we were reminded that this lovely coming-of-age story came out 20 years ago. For the uninitiated, this movie is about an atypical learning experience, in which a high-school student joins a rock-band for a road trip as he attempts to learn how to be a journalist. His muse, Penny Lane, has a signature line, “It’s all happening!” to celebrate the wonder of the moment, and it has a whole new resonance as we embark on a school year like none we’ve seen before. After enduring Spring 2020, an end-to-the-school-year like none we’ve seen before, many students, parents, and teachers spent the summer in anxious anticipation of what the fall would bring. And now, it’s all happening!

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Blog Feature

Classrooms  |  Virtual Learning

Student Engagement is Critical to Distance Learning

  Student engagement is one of the most overused terms in education. We talk about engagement in the classroom, between peers, with families, with the content, and now, virtual engagement. Engagement is certainly important if we talk about it this much, but what does it really mean?

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School Leadership  |  Teachers  |  Virtual Learning

Changing Tack to Sail Into the Wind: Starting a School Year That is Like No Other

In February, my husband and I bought our first home in Pasadena, Maryland, right on a creek that leads into the Chesapeake Bay. What we’ve learned since moving in is that a good number of our neighbors are sailing fanatics, which has led to my husband trying to convince me to buy a small sailboat (a 40-50-year-old Sunfish to be exact). My response was that we needed to build up at least a few skills and knowledge about sailing before making a purchase because the few classes I had taken in the past on a small lake were not going to cut it in the Chesapeake Bay.

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District Leadership  |  Innovative Leadership  |  School Leadership

What We Know For Sure: Three Practices Every Innovative Leader Can Try

"We all get caught up in the business of doing, and sometimes lose our place in the flow” (O Magazine, August 2011). Recently, we were spinning in circles trying to figure out a new process for an internal role we stepped into when Jason shared a way we might reframe our conversation. Shifting from trying to brainstorm as many solutions as possible or uncovering the perfect idea, we instead focused on the simple, yet powerful question: “What do we know for sure?” 

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Communication  |  Equity  |  Teachers  |  Virtual Learning

12 Things Equity Focused Teachers Can Say To Students In The New School Year

As school returns, we know this year presents unique challenges and changes to both educators and students. With such change, it may be especially difficult to communicate with students. While your intentions may be good, sometimes the impact of what we say can have unintended consequences. Consider some of these alternatives to have the impact you wish to have to start the year on a strong note.

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Classrooms  |  School Leadership  |  Virtual Learning

Families and Distance Learning: A Guardian’s Guide To Kicking Off Distance Learning

There is no question that our lives have been flipped around over the last few months. For many of us, we are adjusting to redefining our workspace and even our roles. Our work has changed and so has how we interact. One role that has significantly changed is the role of the parent or guardian of school-aged children. We know that active adults make a huge difference in a child’s success in school but the level to which this is needed has been redefined. While teachers navigate a new normal, the “job” they now must lean on guardians for is to assist in supporting students. This upcoming school year is going to require a level of flexibility from all parties involved and we want to support the parents and guardians as they collaboratively navigate the year with their child’s educators.

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District Leadership  |  Virtual Learning

Making the Leap: A Strategy for Continuous Online Distance Learning in Rural Schools

Planning Amidst Change “Aim small, shoot small,” is an old saying that many of us who occasionally enjoy a round of target practice embrace. But in our case, planning small for how to serve kids during this pandemic, simply was not going to work long-term. Our district Warren County is a rural county in Tennessee with a population of approximately 41,000 people. The entire district is considered economically disadvantaged and is served via the Community Eligibility Provision under the direction of the USDA. 

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Classrooms  |  Social and Emotional Learning  |  Teachers  |  Virtual Learning

What Do Students Need Right Now?